Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member
Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member
Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member
Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member
Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member
Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member

Women's Relaxed Fit T Shirt - Official Member

MEMBER-WRTS-BLACK-S

Regular price $24.95

Are you proud of your Cajun Heritage? And looking for great comfort in a custom t-shirt to show the world how proud you are to be a CAJUN? Look no further! Les Revenant Apparel is proud to present our "Official Member" Cajun Mafia Relaxed Fit T-Shirt! Our Graphic Tees are super soft, fashionably fit and come in a variety of colors for you to choose from. Our products are 100% designed, created and distributed right here in the Heart of Cajun Country!

Our Graphic Tees are crafted with the following details:

  • Relaxed Fit - Baby Rib Short-Sleeve
  • 90% combed and ringspun cotton / 10% polyester
  • Ultra-comfortable and soft for all-day comfort
  • Slim Fit with Sideseam stiching 
  • Tagless, itch-free design

    Delivery Time: Please allow 7-14 days for delivery.

    Learn Cajun (Acadian) History!

    ~Cajuns Endure Death and Slavery

    Although the trip was only a few hundred miles it was terrible and many Cajuns did not survive, The Cajuns were packed in like sardines. They had to remain below deck, and only ~6 at a time were allowed to go up on deck for about ~90 minutes. The weather at the time of the deportation was especially severe, even including an earthquake. ~2 of the ships sank with ~650 Cajuns aboard and only ~27 survived. 

    After arriving in the American colonies, the Cajun exiles did not do very well. They arrived sick, poor, naked, and destitute of every convenience. All the transport ships had bad water and did not enough food for the trip. Many Cajuns died due to malnutrition, shock, disease, and unseaworthy vessels. 

    The Cajuns were met by British colonists who treated them much like African slaves. Some Cajuns even became indentured servants and sold into slavery. Most displaced Cajuns often suffered years of wandering and misery before a permanent new homeland was found. Having few material possessions and constantly searching for lost relatives or friends, the exiles were often scorned and mistreated; their strength was in the spiritual comfort of their Catholic faith, memories, traditions, and hope. 

    On July 26, 1758, Louisbourg, the last French stronghold surrendered to the English. England’s policy was now to get rid of the remaining Cajuns. 

    On August 8, 1758, ~4 British ships and ~500 British soldiers arrived in Acadia to round up all the Cajuns who had escaped in 1755. The Cajuns who resisted were killed. All the rest were sent to France. 

    The deportation went slowly. On October 29, 1758, ~1,500 Cajuns were shipped off to France and on November 5, 1758 another ~2,000 embarked. Of the ~3,000 Cajuns deported in 1758, it is estimated that about ~1,650 of them drowned or died of disease. 

    'Le Grand Dérangement' separated families and displaced approximately ~14,000 of ~18,000 Cajuns. It has been estimated that approximately ~8,000 Cajuns died which is about half of the population.